Rangá Recommends: November 2018

Where to go, what to do and how to dress for the Icelandic weather.



Feeling frosty

Brrrr… it’s cold in here – it must be November in the atmosphere!

That’s right, we are dipping into freezing temperatures this month. While it’s still not time to snowsuit up (unless you are headed up the mountains) you should pack a warm winter jacket, sweaters, scarves, beanies, gloves – the works!

As always, you will want to check the weather forecast each morning before leaving the hotel - it has in fact been unseasonably warm but even for the warmer days, it may be a good idea to bring an extra layer along, just in case. You never know what those pesky Icelandic weather gods are gonna throw at ya.

And remember, you are not just dressing for the day time. We have had some fierce Northern lights recently and they are best enjoyed standing still, outside in the cold at night. Don’t fret if your jacket doesn’t quite cut it, we have snow suits on hand for those in need.


Ride the wave

The music festival Iceland Airwaves is in full swing this weekend. There are numerous off-venue events in Reykjavik but you can also find the Iceland Airwaves 2018 playlist on Spotify.

It boasts a great mix of Icelandic and foreign acts, just like the festival itself and is the perfect soundtrack for a road trip on the south coast, combining culture and nature in the best way.


Eat your heart out

In the darkness of winter, the human body craves comfort food and there is nothing quite as comforting as a hot beverage and some kleinur. This fried pastry is usually referred to as Icelandic twisted doughnuts or crullers, and they are absolutely delicious – especially when homemade.

In other countries in northern Europe, kleinur are most commonly enjoyed around Christmas time but us Icelanders love them all year round. Dip them in hot chocolate or coffee and feel the crunchy buttery crust make way for the soft, full goodness inside.


Soak it in

There’s nothing quite as exemplary of that quintessential Icelandic lifestyle as the geothermally heated swimming pools. Our ancestors bathed in natural hot springs surrounded by nature and modern day Icelanders found a way to make it a part of urban life.

Even some of the smallest villages in the countryside, have their own outdoor community pool, where people of all ages gather to exercise and play, or relax in the hot tubs. There are two lovely community pools in our neighbouring towns, Hella and Hvolsvöllur and if you just feel like relaxing away from it all, the hot tubs outside the hotel are just the ticket.

Having a warm soak in freezing temperatures is a must when visiting Iceland in the winter – but we do recommend drying your hair thoroughly in the changing room before heading back out into the cold.

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